Skip to content
Academic Calendar (Quick link)

 Events Calendar for John Jay CollegeClick here to Print
Event Details
Notify me if this event changes.Add this event to my personal calendar.Email this event to a friend.
Go Back
Pinned, Stitched, and Glitzed: Challenging Gender Stereotypes
Start Date: 9/9/2015Start Time: 1:00 PM
End Date: 11/13/2015End Time: 5:00 PM
Event Description:

Gallery Exhibit: Pinned, Stitched and Glitzed: Challlenging Gender Stereotypes

September 9 through November 13, 2015

Special Saturday Viewing
October 24th, 2015
from 12:00pm-3:00pm


  Unlike sexuality that comes from within the individual, gender role is formed through parental, peer, school and social influences. Many of our early views of life come from the first teachers we encounter. Often our first taste of socially held beliefs such as girls look pretty and are passive, while boys do and are active, are provided to us at this early age. It is important for children to develop strong egos in their socialization phase that can withstand peer and social pressure and to continue in creating healthy relationships.

  With this exhibition largely comprised of delicately appliqued, sewn, pinned and woven works, we are challenging traditionally assigned sex roles and preconceived notions about what are and are not female or male work practices. Consequently, we hope to dispel traditional gender assignations to the work of these artists working with methods traditionally considered as “women’s work” because they are delicately and painstakingly produced. Eozen Agopian for example sews her artworks, a task usually attributed to women, yet she seeks to cross the border of art and objecthood by alluding to painting in her fabric works. Renee Magnanti’s patterns serve her as leitmotifs in producing works that are interlaced, crisscrossed, or interwoven like fiber art. She combines ethnic patterns in her effort to help us see the common bond between peoples of different geographic backgrounds.

  The making of Nicholas Moore’s highly embellished canvasses was greatly impacted through his rearing by parents in the fashion industry. Moore’s mixed media works are encrusted and worked with glittery materials that because of their fragile nature may wrongly be considered feminine in gender stereotyping. Ran Hwang’s work has also been influenced by fashion for it consists of thousands of pinned buttons formulating her subjects that range from Buddhist temples, to spiders and plum blossoms. Hwang partakes of the theory of opposites as in the yin and yang of her native Korean country and because of her background in Buddhist philosophy reflects upon the ephemerality of life. Maria Karametou creates intricate, exquisite and dainty pieces that in their fragility signal what would be popularly taken as feminine embroidery. Karametou's work is multifaceted, however, and juxtaposes the delicate nature of what might be found in a female’s dowry in Ancient Greece against the cold, metallic, métier with her title’s references to war or conflict.

Curated by: Thalia Vrachopoulos
Location Information:
New Building
59th Street and Eleventh Avenue
New York, NY
shiva

Calendar Software powered by Active Calendar and Active Data Calendar   
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search